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The MiC-Guide
name A Guide to Creating or Improving a Natio data 2012-12-11 hit 1,883 file mic_guide_druck_260110_web.pdf(1245k) ,
The creation of a national infrastructure to ensure that a nation’s chemical measurement results are fit for their
purpose has been recognised as a necessity in the modern world of a global economy and trading environment.
However, in many nations of the world, including a number of developed economies, such a Metrology in Chemistry
(MiC) infrastructure is still an ideal rather than a reality. While most economies have in place a structure that
supports the reliability and accuracy of physical measurement, an analogous structure for chemical measurement
remains to be established or completed.
The MiC Guide attempts to set out the issues that should be considered when a nation embarks upon this task of
establishment or improvement of its chemical measurement infrastructure. It should be stressed from the outset
that one major conclusion from the MiC Guide is that there is not a single “correct?way of establishing appropriate
infrastructure. Different nations have vastly different needs and resources and the approach chosen and the
areas to which it is applied may depend markedly on those factors. However, the Guide aims to present a methodology
for deciding which of those approaches is the most suitable for a given set of national circumstances.
While the Guide focuses on issues specific to the metrology system, this should be considered in the broader context
of the whole national standards and conformance infrastructure. Nations should also ensure that internationally
recognised and harmonised activities in accreditation and standardisation are available. The ultimate goal is to
provide testing facilities and services that are internationally accepted.

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